• Perspective Mag

I am Something of Everything

Are you type A or type B? Some might be confused on what to choose because they are both. That's fine, you're not alone. Being categorised into various types puts labels on us and then we are anticipated to live up to the expectations of our classification. But does it have to be like that?


Humans like to classify everything they see for their convenience, but what if the thing or person they are labelling doesn't want a tag on them? Labelling someone as ‘shy’ or ‘confident’ limits our behaviour to those definitions. Even when a guy labelled as ‘shy’ wants to speak up confidently, he'll think a thousand times before speaking because people had not expected that from him and would not take him seriously because he does not belong to that category. But what if he isn't really like that? What if he is shy in front of strangers and super confident in front of his friends and family? Without knowing this, how can we assume that the person is shy?


A recent season released by Netflix called "The Bold Type" has created much hype among feminists and activists alike. Applause and praise on breaking stereotypes has made the drama a success. At first when I watched the season, I questioned why they called it "The Bold Type"? I didn't think of every character as bold. Yet I continued to watch. And I realized that the series showed a bold side of every character in it, whether it be Jane's surgery, Sutton's marriage, or Alex's podcast. While still owning their personalities, each character lived up to the title of the series.


Such is the reality of the 21st century. While staying true to our inner self, we can still try new and different things and make them a part of us. We don't need labels to tell us what to do. We don't need to live up to the definitions of various types to be able to fit in. And why do we even use the word "fit in"? Why can't we just create our own space and let people like us join?


Gen Z is discovering new identities every day, from gender to family to personality. But what is the need for this? As the youth is trying to make the world realize what affect labelling and categorization can have on personalities, people are coming out and owning themselves. I am one of them. I have always been labelled as a confident and outspoken person, but the pandemic and confrontation with recent epiphanies has helped me find my identity. I don't want to be always outspoken. Sometimes I want to be quiet and listen to others. I don't want to be in the lead every time. Sometimes I want others to take charge so I can follow and learn.


Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose. That's the cycle of life. You don't have to be productive everyday. Some days you don't want to get out of bed and that's okay. You can give that time to yourself, to heal and start living life again instead of surviving through it. You'll have everything you ever wanted, yet nothing would feel right.


We all suffer through identity crises at some point in our lives. But do we really need identities? Can't we just be humans? Is it necessary for us to be Pakistani or American, Religious or Modern, Introvert or Extrovert? Can't we be just ourselves without any tags on us and without the need to live up to those expectations? Encountering such a situation does not necessarily mean cutting yourself from the world and not socializing. You can go out there wearing a mask of perfection and still doubt every step and decision you take.. Every person experiences it in a different way. They can be really outspoken and still second guess every word coming out of their mouth.


We all have a Kat, Jane and Sutton hidden in us and we can take them out whenever we are ready. We can't let other people limit our abilities and qualities by categorising us. We can't let them control us. We have built this life for ourselves and we are going to live it on our own terms so why bother thinking about whether you're type A or type B. We need to find our inner self for our own sake, not for others. As for me, I think I just found myself while writing this; I am something of everything.